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WINEMAKING RED WINESWINEMAKING WHITE WINES

As for the white wines, we also focus the same meticulous, almost fanatical attention on winemaking:
The way we sort the grapes
is an excellent example of our respect for the ripe fruit throughout the winemaking process.

Putting into vat: The whole, uncrushed berries are taken to the appropriate vat via a small 3 hl mobile vat. The grapes fall into the vat by gravity flow, yet another example of the estate's emphasis on quality: The fruit is treated totally gently this way.

Pre-fermentation maceration: when the grapes are put into vat, we lower the temperature for cold maceration prior to alcoholic fermentation. This is ideal for bringing out colour and aromas.

Fermentation: Alcoholic fermentation begins spontaneously thanks to indigenous yeast. This yeast “eats” the sugar and transforms it into alcohol, carbonic gas, and heat. The solid matter rises and forms as cap at the top of the vat. The temperature also rises at this time. The art of winemaking consists of maintaining the right temperature and contact between the cap and the juice.

« I can indeed choose a pressing method which is soft and long-lasting, an extraction of the juices under low pressure, without risking oxidation and thus we are able to extract all the qualitative potential of our grapes. » Fabien TEITGEN, Technical Director

Post-fermentation maceration: The vats are kept at a temperature of 28°C and left on the skins as long as it takes for the wine to form its tannic structure and acquire the right degree of richness. We monitor how maceration is going by regular tastings.

Running off and pressing: We run off the free run juice (part of which goes into new oak barrels), separating it from the solid matter in the vat. This is then used to make the press wine. “We put the wine into barrel at an early stage when it is ‘still warm’. This definitely enhances the interaction between the wine and the oak. This is better integrated and more understated as a result.”

Barrel ageing: The secondary, or malolactic fermentation takes place partly in vat, and partly in barrel. This is essential for stabilising red wines.

We keep the wine on its lees for the few first months of ageing and decide what winemaking operations to do based on weekly tastings. We rack the wine very little.

« When we monitor the extraction with precision, we don't need to proceed to multiple rackings (soutirages) because we don't have any bad tannin to remove. Therefore we preserve the full potential of the wine. » Fabien TEITGEN, Technical Director

Bottling: We bottle our fine red wine after 16-18 months ageing in an oxygen-free atmosphere to maintain ageing potential.

Château Smith Haut Lafitte – 33650 Bordeaux Martillac, France
Tel. +33 (0)5 57 83 11 22 – Fax +33 (0)5 57 83 11 21 – f.cathiard@smith-haut-lafitte.com
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